You don't eat Indian and Chinese food at the same meal: The bisexual quandary

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Abstract

The paper reports on six months observations at the meetings of a bisexual social group in New York. It presents the participants' narratives about their sexual histories, and describes the ambience experienced at the special social events they initiated. The discourse, and the behavior displayed, offer an opportunity to explore the participants' search of space to enable them to express their unique identity and its uncertainties. The conclusions focus on the role of bisexuality in the landscape of sexuality dominated by the binary division of heterosexuality/homosexuality. The paper applies the ethnographic method to a field neglected by anthropologists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-90
Number of pages28
JournalAnthropological Quarterly
Volume75
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Bisexuality
  • Ethnography
  • Gay culture

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