Wounding of Arabidopsis leaves induces indole-3-carbinol-dependent autophagy in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In cruciferous plants insect attack or physical damage induce the synthesis of the glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol, which plays a key role in the defense against attackers. Indole-3-carbinol also affects plant growth and development, acting as an auxin antagonist by binding to the TIR1 auxin receptor. Other potential functions of indole-3-carbinol and the underlying mechanisms in plant biology are unknown. Here we show that an indole-3-carbinol-dependent signal induces specific autophagy in root cells. Leaf treatment with exogenous indole-3-carbinol or leaf-wounding induced autophagy and inhibited auxin response in the root. This induction is lost in glucosinolate-defective mutants, indicating that the effect of indole-3-carbinol is transported in the plants. Thus, indole-3-carbinol is not only a defensive metabolite that repels insects, but is also involved in long-distance communication regulating growth and development in plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)779-787
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Journal
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2017

Keywords

  • TIR1/AFBs
  • autophagy
  • auxin
  • glucosinolates
  • indole-3-carbinol
  • wounding Arabidopsis thaliana

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