With great speed come small buffers: Space-bandwidth tradeoffs for routing

Avery Miller, Boaz Patt-Shamir, Will Rosenbaum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

We consider the Adversarial Queuing Theory (AQT) model, where packet arrivals are subject to a maximum average rate 0 1 and burstiness 0. In this model, we analyze the size of buffers required to avoid overflows in the basic case of a path. Our main results characterize the space required by the average rate and the number of distinct destinations: we show that O( d1/ + ) space suffice, where d is the number of distinct destinations and =1/ and we show that (1 over d1/ + ) space is necessary. For directed trees, we describe an algorithm whose buffer space requirement is at most 1 + d' + σ where d' is the maximum number of destinations on any root-leaf path.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPODC 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages117-126
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450362177
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Jul 2019
Event38th ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, PODC 2019 - Toronto, Canada
Duration: 29 Jul 20192 Aug 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing

Conference

Conference38th ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, PODC 2019
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityToronto
Period29/07/192/08/19

Funding

FundersFunder number
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of CanadaRGPIN.2017.05936
Israel Science Foundation1444/14

    Keywords

    • Adversarial queuing theory
    • Buffer overflow
    • Directed paths
    • Directed trees
    • Multiple destinations
    • Packet forwarding
    • Packet networks

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