What makes you think that you are a health expert? The effect of objective knowledge and cognitive structuring on self-epistemic authority

Yoram Bar-Tal, Katarzyna Stasiuk, Renata Maksymiuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Self-epistemic authority (SEA) refers to the subjective judgement of the level of expertise and knowledge a person has in a given domain. While it is reasonable to assume that people's perception of SEA reflects their level of objective knowledge in the given domain, there is evidence to show that people are not optimal judges of their own knowledge. Thus, the present study examined the interaction between the participants’trait-like characteristics of need for cognitive closure (NFC) and efficacy to fulfill the need for cognitive closure (EFNC), which affects the use of cognitive structuring, as a source of SEA. Results of the study confirm that objective knowledge as well as a cognitive-motivational epistemic process (interaction between NFC and EFNC) affect SEA. For high EFNC individuals, the effect of NFC on SEA was positive. However, for low EFNC individuals, the relationship was negative.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalAdvances in Cognitive Psychology
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Cognitive structuring
  • Efficacy to fulfil need for closure
  • Epistemic motivation
  • Expertise
  • Need for closure
  • Objective knowledge
  • Self-epistemic authority

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'What makes you think that you are a health expert? The effect of objective knowledge and cognitive structuring on self-epistemic authority'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this