Wearable assistant for Parkinsons disease patients with the freezing of gait symptom

Marc Bächlin*, Meir Plotnik, Daniel Roggen, Inbal Maidan, Jeffrey M. Hausdorff, Nir Giladi, Gerhard Tröster

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we present a wearable assistant for Parkinsons disease (PD) patients with the freezing of gait (FOG) symptom. This wearable system uses on-body acceleration sensors to measure the patients movements. It automatically detects FOG by analyzing frequency components inherent in these movements. When FOG is detected, the assistant provides a rhythmic auditory signal that stimulates the patient to resume walking. Ten PD patients tested the system while performing several walking tasks in the laboratory. More than 8 h of data were recorded. Eight patients experienced FOG during the study, and 237 FOG events were identified by professional physiotherapists in a post hoc video analysis. Our wearable assistant was able to provide online assistive feedback for PD patients when they experienced FOG. The system detected FOG events online with a sensitivity of 73.1% and a specificity of 81.6%. The majority of patients indicated that the context-aware automatic cueing was beneficial to them. Finally, we characterize the system performance with respect to the walking style, the sensor placement, and the dominant algorithm parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5325884
Pages (from-to)436-446
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Funding

FundersFunder number
European 6th Framework Program018474-2
Israeli Ministry for Veteran Affairs3-00000-4385

    Keywords

    • Assistive cueing
    • Context awareness
    • Freezing of gait (FOG)
    • Parkinson's disease (PD)
    • Personal health assistant

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Wearable assistant for Parkinsons disease patients with the freezing of gait symptom'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this