Volumetric MRI study of the brain in fetuses with intrauterine cytomegalovirus infection and its correlation to neurodevelopmental outcome

A. Grinberg, E. Katorza, D. Hoffman, R. Ber, A. Mayer, S. Lipitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In recent years, effort has been made to study 3D biometry as a method for fetal brain assessment. In this study, we aimed to compare brain volumes of fetuses with cytomegalovirus infection and noninfected controls. Also, we wanted to assess whether there is a correlation to their neurodevelopmental outcome as observed after several years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study examined MR imaging brain scans of 42 fetuses (at 30 -34 weeks' gestational age) that were diagnosed with intrauterine cytomegalovirus infection. Volumetric measurements of 6 structures were assessed using a semiautomated designated program and were compared with a control group of 50 fetuses. Data collected included prenatal history and MR imaging and sonographic and neurodevelopmental follow-up. RESULTS: Wefound that all brain volumes measured were smaller in the cytomegalovirus-infected group and that there was a correlation between smaller cerebellar volume and lower Vineland II Adaptive Behavior Scales questionnaire scores, especially in the fields of daily living and communication skills. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that brain volumes are affected by intrauterine cytomegalovirus infection and that it has a developmental prognostic meaning. Such information, which should be supported by further research, may help clinicians further analyze imaging data to treat and make a better assessment of these fetuses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-358
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2019

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