Vitamin A-deficient diet accelerated atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-/- mice and dietary β -carotene prevents this consequence

Noa Zolberg Relevy, Dror Harats, Ayelet Harari, Ami Ben-Amotz, Rafael Bitzur, Ralph Rühl, Aviv Shaish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE-/-). ApoE-/- mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61%) compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency.

Original languageEnglish
Article number758723
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 23 Feb 2015

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