Visual split brain and monocular deprivation in kittens: differentiation between the effects of disuse and of binocular competition in visual cortex cells

Uri Yinon, Meir Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To differentiate between the resulting effect of disuse, developmentally induced by deprivation, and the binocular competition effect on cortical cells, visual split brain was performed concurrently with monocular deprivation in kittens. In the experienced hemisphere of the split brain deprived cats (ipsilaterally to the non-deprived eye), there were twice as many visually responsive cortical cells than found in their inexperienced hemisphere (ipsilaterally to the deprived eye); however, these cells were equal in number to that found in the split brain controls. In the monocularly deprived control cats a relation of 3.2 was found between cells driven by the non-deprived and the deprived eye. Visual disuse, therefore, resulting from monocular deprivation, affects cortical cells under complete absence of binocular competition but is greatly enhanced by the latter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-278
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1988

Keywords

  • Binocular competition
  • Cortical cell
  • Kitten
  • Monocular deprivation
  • Ocular dominance
  • Split brain
  • Visual disuse

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