Vaccination can drive an increase in frequencies of antibiotic resistance among nonvaccine serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Uri Obolski*, José Lourenço, Craig Thompson, Robin Thompson, Andrea Gori, Sunetra Gupta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major public health concern, being responsible for more than 1.5 million deaths annually through pneumonia, meningitis, and septicemia. Available vaccines target only a subset of serotypes, so vaccination is often accompanied by a rise in the frequency of nonvaccine serotypes. Epidemiological studies suggest that such a change in serotype frequencies is often coupled with an increase of antibiotic resistance among nonvaccine serotypes. Building on previous multilocus models for bacterial pathogen population structure, we have developed a theoretical framework incorporating variation of serotype and antibiotic resistance to examine how their associations may be affected by vaccination. Using this framework, we find that vaccination can result in a rapid increase in the frequency of preexisting resistant variants of nonvaccine serotypes due to the removal of competition from vaccine serotypes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3102-3107
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume115
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Funding

FundersFunder number
Seventh Framework Programme268904
Medical Research CouncilMR/N023129/1

    Keywords

    • Antibiotic resistance
    • Ecological competition
    • Epidemiology
    • Mathematical model
    • Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Vaccination can drive an increase in frequencies of antibiotic resistance among nonvaccine serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this