Usefulness of the protection motivation theory in explaining hearing protection device use among male industrial workers

Samuel Melamed, Stanley Rabinowitz, Mabel Feiner, Esther Weisberg, Joseph Ribak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study examined the usefulness of personal variables: noise annoyance, and components of the protection motivation theory (R. W. Rogers, 1983) along with social-organizational factors in explaining hearing protection device (HPD) use among Israeli manufacturing workers. Participants were 281 men exposed to harmful noise levels for which routine HPD use is required by regulation. In practice, 3 HPD user groups were identified: nonusers (n = 38), occasional users (n = 125), and regular users (n = 118). HPD use was objectively verified. HPD use was primarily related to the personal variables but not to management pressure, coworker pressure, or family support. The most powerful predictors of HPD use were perceived self-efficacy (for long-term HPD use), perceived susceptibility (to hearing loss), and noise annoyance, together explaining 48% of the outcome variance. These findings have implications for interventions aimed at motivating workers to use HPDs regularly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-215
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1996

Keywords

  • Hearing protectors
  • Industrial workers
  • Noise exposure
  • Protection motivation theory

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Usefulness of the protection motivation theory in explaining hearing protection device use among male industrial workers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this