Urinary Continence Following Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy

J. RAMON, P. LEANDRI, G. ROSSIGNOL, J. R. GAUTIER

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Summary Between 1983 and 1989,484 men (46–82 years old) underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Six months after surgery, 434 patients (90%) achieved complete urinary control; stress incontinence was present in 50 patients (10%) and no patient was totally incontinent. Of the 398 patients who were followed up for more than 1 year, 377 (95%) achieved complete urinary control and 21 (5%) experienced stress incontinence. Prior open prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate had no influence on the return of urinary control. Pathological stage and preservation or not of the neurovascular bundles also had no significant influence on the long‐term state of continence. Age was the only factor that adversely affected the return of urinary continence. The average interval between surgery and return of continence was shorter in patients less than 70 years old. When the impact of age was examined 1 year or more after surgery, no significant difference was noted between the age groups. Several technical considerations that contribute to these results are discussed, especially the use of a gradual approach to the apex of the prostate to facilitate exposure and haemostasis and to preserve as much of the striated urethral sphincter as possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Urology
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1993
Externally publishedYes

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