Unrecognized renal insufficiency and chemotherapy-associated adverse effects among breast cancer patients

Eyal Lotan, Avi Leader, Michael Lishner*, Maya Gottfried, David Pereg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several studies have shown that more than half of cancer patients have unrecognized renal insufficiency (RI), which is a reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with normal serum creatinine. The aim of this study was to determine whether unrecognized RI is associated with an increased risk for chemotherapy-associated adverse effects in breast cancer patients treated with combined doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide treatment. GFR was estimated for 95 breast cancer patients from January 2005 to August 2009 using the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Unrecognized RI was defined as GFR less than 75 ml/min/1.73 m and the patients were grouped according to their estimated GFR. Logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of GFR on clinical outcomes. In total, 49 (52%) patients experienced at least one of the following chemotherapy-associated adverse effects during the course of treatment: an episode of neutropenic fever with hospital admission, a delay in chemotherapy treatment for a medical reason, a need for dose adjustment because of toxicity of the chemotherapeutic drugs, and the need for use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The incidence of these adverse effects occurred more frequently in patients with GFR less than 75 compared with patients with GFR at least 75 (64 vs. 42%, odds ratio 5.29, 95% confidence interval 2.10-13.33) and remained statistically significant after adjustment for age, BMI, and initial doses of chemotherapeutic drugs (odds ratio 3.56, 95% confidence interval 1.08-11.67). Neutropenic fever, dose delay, and dose adjustment as separate outcomes occurred more frequently in the GFR less than 75 group but lost statistical significance after adjustment. Our results demonstrate that unrecognized RI is associated with an increased risk for chemotherapy-associated adverse events in this patient population. Further prospective studies are required to determine whether a dose reduction in patients with unrecognized RI reduces adverse effects without adversely affecting the benefit of treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)991-995
Number of pages5
JournalAnti-Cancer Drugs
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • cyclophosphamide
  • glomerular filtration rate
  • renal insufficiency

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