Unique gene expression patterns in human T-cell lines generated from multiple sclerosis patients by stimulation with a synthetic MOG peptide

Mathilda Mandel*, Michael Gurevich, Gad Lavie, Irun R. Cohen, Anat Achiron

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease where T-cells activated against myelin antigens are involved in myelin destruction. Yet, healthy subjects also harbor T-cells responsive to myelin antigens, suggesting that MS patient-derived autoimmune T-cells might bear functional differences from T-cells derived from healthy individuals. We addressed this issue by analyzing gene expression patterns of myelin oligodendrocytic glycoprotein (MOG) responsive T-cell lines generated from MS patients and healthy subjects. We identified 150 transcripts that were differentially expressed between MS patients and healthy controls. The most informative 43 genes exhibited > 1.5-fold change in expression level. Eighteen genes were up-regulated including BCL2, lifeguard, IGFBP3 and VEGF. Twenty five genes were down-regulated, including apoptotic activators like TNF and heat shock protein genes. This gene expression pattern was unique to MOG specific T-cell lines and was not expressed in T-cell lines reactive to tetanus toxin (TTX). Our results indicate that activation in MS that promotes T-cell survival and expansion, has its own state and that the unique gene expression pattern that characterize autoreactive T-cells in MS represent a constellation of factors in which the chronicity, timing and accumulation of damage make the difference between health and disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Gene expression
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • T-cell lines

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