Ultrapure filter does not confer short-term benefits over two reverse osmosis systems in chronic hemodialysis patients

Ayelet Grupper, Moshe Shashar, Talia Weinstein, Orit Kliuk Ben Bassat, Shoni Levy, Idit F. Schwartz, Avital Angel, Aharon Baruch, Avishay Grupper, Gil Chernin, Doron Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Dialysate purity contributes to the inflammatory response that afflicts hemodialysis patients. Objectives: To compare the clinical and laboratory effects of using ultrapure water produced by a water treatment system including two reverse osmosis (RO) units in series, with a system that also includes an ultrapure filter (UPF). Methods: We performed a retrospective study in 193 hemodialysis patients during two periods: period A (no UPF, 6 months) and period B (same patients, with addition of UPF, 18 months), and a historical cohort of patients treated in the same dialysis unit 2 years earlier, which served as a control group. Results: Mean C-reactive protein, serum albumin and systolic blood pressure worsened in period B compared to period A and in the controls. Conclusions: A double RO system to produce ultrapure water is not inferior to the use of ultrapure filters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-9
Number of pages5
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Hemodialysis
  • Reverse osmosis (RO)
  • Ultrapure filters (UPF)
  • Ultrapure water, water treatment system

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