Two Nails 2400 Years Apart: Metallurgical Comparison Between Copper Nails of the Ma‘agan Mikhael Ship and Its Replica

D. Cvikel, D. Ashkenazi, A. Inberg, I. Shteiman, N. Iddan, Y. Kahanov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Ma‘agan Mikhael ship, dated to 400 BC, was built ‘shell-first’, with the planks first connected edge-to-edge by mortise-and-tenon joints, and then, the frames were fastened to the pre-existing shell by double-clenched copper nails. The construction of a sailing replica began in 2014. The aims of the project are to increase knowledge of ancient ship construction, and to test her sailing capabilities. The shipwrights of the replica reproduced the original components to the closest possible degree of material, shape, and methods. One of the most intriguing elements is the copper nails. The aim of this study was to investigate the replica nails by comparing them with the original shipwreck nails. One example of each nail was tested by archeometallurgical methods. It was demonstrated that the nails of the replica and the original nails of the Ma‘agan Mikhael ship were similar, thus providing additional information on the manufacturing technique of the nails and their application in the hull.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-21
Number of pages10
JournalMetallography, Microstructure, and Analysis
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Copper nails
  • Ma‘agan Mikhael ship
  • Metallurgical characterization
  • Microstructure
  • Replica

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