Tubal superfetation following frozen–thawed single-embryo transfers in two separate cycles: Case report and literature review

Eric Ohana, Benzion Samueli, Moran Shahar, Avi Ben-Haroush, Yoel Shufaro*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Superfetation is a very rare occurrence. In the context of assisted reproduction, it has been reported only as an intrauterine pregnancy after ovarian stimulation and/or embryo transfer in the presence of an undiagnosed ectopic pregnancy. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old anovulatory patient, gravida 1 para 1, who underwent two frozen–thawed single-blastocyst transfers in separate cycles. The patient reported that 12 days after the first transfer, she had menstrual bleeding and stopped her estradiol and progesterone supplementation without undergoing a blood human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) test. At her request, a second cycle was immediately initiated, with endometrial thickness measuring 4 mm. Eleven days after the second transfer, the βhCG value was inappropriately high. A right tubal pregnancy corresponding to 8 gestational weeks was diagnosed. Laparoscopy revealed a prominent right tubal pregnancy in addition to a significantly smaller left tubal pregnancy. The discordant tubal pregnancies were confirmed histologically. To our knowledge, superfetation involving a second ectopic pregnancy coexistent with a first, contralateral ectopic pregnancy consequent to consecutive in vitro fertilization procedures has not previously been described in the medical literature. This case emphasizes the importance of routine βhCG testing after every IVF cycle, even if apparently unsuccessful.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • IVF
  • artificial endometrial preparation
  • case report
  • frozen–thawed embryo transfer
  • superfetation
  • tubal pregnancy

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