Tribal associations, tribal solidarity, and tribal chauvinism in a kenya town

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Abstract

From a close analysis of African activities and actions in the Kenyan town of Nakuru from the 1920s to the 1960s, it is argued that living in towns tended to consolidate the identities of tribal groups and to exacerbate their differences. Contrasts between the urban responses of the Kikuyu, on the one hand, and the Western Kenyan tribes, the Luo and the Abaluhya, on the other, are analysed, and are related to differences in the tribal structures and in the political, economic and social changes that were taking place in their rural areas. By the early 1960s, the stage was set for open political competition between tribal groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-274
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of African History
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1973

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