Transplacental effects of high fat diets on functional activity of the spleen and lymph nodes, cell kinetics and apoptosis in mammary gland tumors in female rat offspring.

George Kossoy, Aliza Stark, Yevgenie Tendler, Herzl Ben-Hur, Dzhemali Beniashvili, Zecharia Madar, Itshak Zusman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We studied whether feeding pregnant female rats different high fat diets affects structural zones in the spleen and lymph nodes, involved in production of T and B cells, as well as cell kinetics and apoptosis in some offspring with mammary glands tumors. Rat mothers were fed either a 7% or 15% corn-oil or a 7% or 15% olive-oil diet. At four weeks of age, female offspring (n=10-15 per group) were transferred to 7% corn oil diet. Five-week old offspring were exposed twice to the carcinogen, dimethylbenz(a)antracene (10 mg/rat/week). Three months later, tumors were counted and sized, and samples from the spleen, axillary lymph nodes and tumors collected for immunohistochemical analyses. Feeding the mothers with both the 7% and 15% olive-oil diets significantly increased the number of tumor-free rats in offspring. Tumors were characterized with active mitosis, intensive lymphoid infiltration inside a knot and high rates of apoptosis, particularly in tumors obtained from rats whose mothers were fed the 15% olive-oil diet. In the spleen, the 15% olive-oil diet significantly increased the areas of the follicles and germinal centers but only in tumor-free rats. In tumor-bearing rats, areas of germinal centers increased compared to the 7% olive-oil diet. The 15% olive-oil diet increased all areas of the lymph nodes in tumor-free rats, while in tumor-bearing rats, this diet increased the areas of the cortex and mantle layer. We conclude that exposure to various diets in utero and during lactation affects the immune system. In addition, the promotion of apoptosis may play a key role in the mechanisms involved in the transplacental effects on mammary tumor development as seen using a 15% olive-oil diet, similar to the high fat diets of Mediterranean countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)773-778
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Medicine
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

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