To test or not to test? Moderators of the relationship between risk perceptions and interest in predictive genetic testing

Shoshana Shiloh, Shiri Ilan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The moderating effects of motivational factors (illness prevention vs. emotional reassurance), regulatory focus (health vs. illness orientations), and cancer anxiety on the relationship between risk perceptions and women's interest in predictive genetic testing for breast cancer were studied among 102 women with no history of breast cancer. Risk perceptions per se were unrelated to testing interests. Perceptions of higher personal risk for developing breast cancer were positively related to women's interest in testing only among women whose dominant motivation was not emotional reassurance, who were not oriented towards ruling-out disease, and who were not highly anxious about breast cancer. These findings pointed to conditions under which risk perceptions may enhance screening behaviors, and other conditions under which they may not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-479
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Genetic testing
  • Risk perceptions

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