To take or not to take genetic carrier tests: personal characteristics associated with taking recommended and nonrecommended tests.

Sivia Barnoy*, Lilian Zelikaman, Yoram Bar-Tal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

AIMS: Genetic testing has become a routine part of prenatal care, the test being offered according to ethnic origin. However, not all clients take the offered tests while others take unnecessary tests. The present study aimed at examining the effects of risk perception, hypochondria, trait anxiety, and attitudes to genetic testing on the uptake of genetic carrier tests. METHODS: One hundred and six pregnant Israeli women completed a six-part questionnaire covering demographic details, hypochondria, trait anxiety, risk perception, attitudes, and the uptake of genetic carrier tests. The uptake of recommended and nonrecommended tests (according to origin) was analyzed separately. RESULTS: Women underwent many unnecessary tests. The uptake of recommended and nonrecommended tests is highly intercorrelated. Attitude was the only predictor for taking the recommended tests, but attitudes, trait anxiety, and hypochondria predicted the uptake of nonrecommended tests. Risk perception was not significantly related to the dependent variables. CONCLUSIONS: Attitudes toward genetic testing is an important factor in the decision to take genetic carrier tests. It is important to understand the different causal factors for taking recommended and nonrecommended tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-458
Number of pages6
JournalGenetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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