To eat or not to eat? Indicators for reduced food intake in 91,245 patients hospitalized on nutritionDays 2006-2014 in 56 countries worldwide: A descriptive analysis

Karin Schindler, Michael Themessl-Huber, Michael Hiesmayr, Sigrid Kosak, Mitja Lainscak, Alessandro Laviano, Olle Ljungqvist, Mohamed Mouhieddine, Stephane Schneider, Marian De Van Der Schueren, Tatjana Schütz, Christian Schuh, Pierre Singer, Peter Bauer, Claude Pichard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Inadequate nutrition during hospitalization is strongly associated with poor patient outcome, but ensuring adequate food intake is not a priority in clinical routine worldwide. This lack of priority results in inadequate and unbalanced food intake in patients and huge amounts of wasted food. Objectives: We evaluate the main factors that are associated with reduced meal intake in hospitalized patients and the differences between geographical regions. Design: We conducted a descriptive analysis of data from 9 consecutive, annual, and cross-sectional nutritionDay samples (2006-2014) in a total of 91,245 adult patients in 6668 wards in 2584 hospitals in 56 countries. A general estimation equation methodology was used to develop a model for meal intake, and P-value thresholding was used for model selection. Results: The proportion of patients who ate a full meal varied widely (24.7-61.5%) across world regions. The factors that were most strongly associated with reduced food intake on nutritionDay were reduced intake during the previous week (OR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.22), confinement to bed (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.55), female sex (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.5, 0.56), younger age (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.85) and older age (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.74; 0.88), and low body mass index (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.90). The pattern of associated factors was homogenous across world regions. Conclusions: A set of factors that are associated with full meal intake was identified and is applicable to patients hospitalized in any region of the world. Thus, the likelihood for reduced food intake is easily estimated through access to patient characteristics, independent of world regions, and enables the easy personalization of food provision.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1393-1402
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume104
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disease-related malnutrition
  • Food intake
  • Hospital
  • Mobility
  • Patient sex
  • Undernutrition

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