Titers of SARS CoV-2 antibodies in cord blood of neonates whose mothers contracted SARS CoV-2 (COVID-19) during pregnancy and in those whose mothers were vaccinated with mRNA to SARS CoV-2 during pregnancy

Lior Kashani-Ligumsky, Miriam Lopian, Ronnie Cohen, Hila Senderovich, Shelly Czeiger, Ariel Halperin, Adina Bar Chaim, Irit Kremer, Joseph B. Lessing, Eli Somekh, Ran Neiger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We compared neonatal immunity after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy to that achieved after maternal infection. Study design: We tested cord blood from women infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy (group 1, n = 29), women who were vaccinated during pregnancy (group 2, n = 29) and from women not infected and not vaccinated (Group 3, n = 21) for titers of antibodies to both SARS-CoV-2 spike and ‘N’ proteins. Results: Seventy-nine women were included: Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein were detected in all samples from Group 1 and 2. Antibodies to the ‘N’ protein were detected in 25/29 samples in Group 1. None of the samples from Group 3 had antibodies to either protein. Mean titers of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Neonates born to mothers vaccinated during pregnancy have higher antibody titers and may therefore have more prolonged protection than those born to women infected during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2621-2624
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

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