Time to Resolution of Infection in COVID-19 Patients: the Experience of a Tertiary Medical Center in Israel

Emily Lubart*, Gilad Gal, Eliyahu H. Mizrahi, Ahuva Tzabary, Ehuda Baumohl, Erica Pinco, Zuhdi Idkiedek, Eisa Haj Ali, Maya Berger, Galina Goltsman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the spread of coronavirus disease, reports have indicated that young patients are usually asymptomatic with a short convalescence period. The current study compared the time to resolution of infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Seventy-six patients aged 44.4 ± 23.3 years were admitted to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) unit during the study period. Data were collected from patient records. Throat and nasal swabs for COVID-19 were collected for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Time to resolution of infection was defined as the number of days from the date of the first COVID-19 positive outcome to the second consecutive negative PCR results. Most patients showed COVID-19 signs and symptoms (71.1%) between 1 and 6 days, and the rest were asymptomatic. No association was found between the time to resolution of infection and the presence of COVID-19 signs and symptoms (symptomatic: median [Md] 10.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.4–11.6; asymptomatic: Md 15.0, 95% CI 10.5–15.5; P = 0.54). Age was not correlated with the number of COVID-19 signs and symptoms (r = 0.13, P = 0.37) or with the time to resolution of infection (r = 0.06, P = 0.58). In patients with mild to moderate symptoms, the time to resolution of infection from COVID-19 is not different from that in asymptomatic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-147
Number of pages4
JournalJapanese Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • symptomatic vs asymptomatic patients
  • time to resolution of infection

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