Time and well-being, an institutional, comparative perspective: Is it time to explore the idea of a time policy?

Lihi Lahat*, Itai Sened

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between time and well-being as a social policy question. Although the research on time and well-being is extensive, few have dealt with them together from a comparative institutional perspective. Based on data from the third European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) of 2012, regarding 34 mostly European countries, in different welfare regimes, we explore two issues: (1) What are the effects of welfare regimes on the uses of time and subjective well-being? and (2) What are the effects of different uses of time on subjective well-being? We find that the institutional structure – the welfare regime – affects the way people use their time. Furthermore, the findings documented that uses of time have a direct effect on well-being when controlling for individual level as well as country-level variables. These findings may have important implications for policymaking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-292
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of European Social Policy
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • comparative
  • institutions
  • time
  • welfare regimes
  • well-being

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