Thyroid hormone regulates adhesion, migration and matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity via avß3 integrin in myeloma cells

Keren Cohen, Nir Flint, Shahar Shalev, Daniel Erez, Tal Baharal, Paul J. Davis, Aleck Hercbergs, Martin Ellis, Osnat Ashur-Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thyroid hormone (3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, T3; L-thyroxine, T4) enhances cancer cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis via a discrete receptor located near the RGD recognition site on avß3 integrin. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticulate formulation interfere with binding of T3/T4 to the integrin. This integrin is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers. MM cells interact with avß3 integrin to support growth and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes active in tissue remodeling and cancer. The association between integrins and MMPs secretion and action is well established. In the current study, we examined the effects of thyroid hormone on myeloma cell adhesion, migration and MMP activity. We show that T3 and T4 increased myeloma adhesion to fibronectin and induced avß3 clustering. In addition, the hormones induced MMP-9 expression and activation via avß3 and MAPK induction. Bortezomib, a standard myeloma treatment, caused a decrease in activity/quantity of MMPs and thyroid hormone opposed this effect. RGD peptide and tetrac impaired the production of MMP-9 in cell lines and in primary BM cells from myeloma patients. In conclusion, thyroid hormone-dependent regulation via avß3 of myeloma cell adhesion and MMP-9 production may play a role in myeloma migration and progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6312-6322
Number of pages11
JournalOncotarget
Volume5
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Adhesion
  • Integrin
  • MMP-9
  • Myeloma
  • Thyroid hormone

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