Threat perception of climate change & public preparedness for extreme weather-related events in Bermuda - A cross-sectional study

Brett Lefkowitz, Moran Bodas*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bermuda is subject to the impact of extreme weather-related events (EWE). Climate change (CC) risks in Bermuda include the increased frequency and severity of hurricane storms. Objectives of this study encompass the measurement of the levels of preparedness for these hazards and the evaluation of the public's perception of the threat of CC. A cross-sectional study utilizing an online questionnaire was employed. The sample included 631 respondents from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. The primary outcome was the Preparedness Index (PI), measuring compliance with eleven recommended actions. The PI's mean was 7.24 (SD = 2.42). Preparedness actions with the highest compliance included possession of a torch (97.83%) and the availability of a three-day supply of food (87.70%) and water (87.52%). Actions least complied with included the preparation of a family plan (35.62%). PI was positively correlated with a higher sense of preparedness (r = 0.238; p < 0.001) and with age (r = 0.201; p < 0.001). Predictors of PI were gender (female), older age, sense of preparedness, searching for information, and membership in a neighborhood community. A comparison of local outcomes with the Yale International CC Study provides salient insights into CC attitudes in Bermuda. The findings demonstrate a relatively high level of preparedness for EWE, identify a new “storm climate,” and acknowledge the magnitude of the CC threat.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104030
JournalInternational Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
Volume97
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Oct 2023

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Climate change
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Extreme weather-related events
  • Threat perception

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Threat perception of climate change & public preparedness for extreme weather-related events in Bermuda - A cross-sectional study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this