The visual search analogue of latent inhibition: Implications for theories of irrelevant stimulus processing in normal and schizophrenic groups

R. E. Lubow, Oren Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Latent inhibition (LI) is a robust phenomenon that is demonstrated when a previously inconsequential stimulus is less effective in a new learning situation than a novel stimulus. Despite LI's simplicity, there is considerable disagreement as to its theoretical basis. Attentional theories claim that unattended stimulus preexposures reduce stimulus associability. Alternatively, it has been asserted that associability is unaffected and that LI is a result of competition/retrieval processes. The present article reviews a series of visual search studies, some with normal subjects, both undifferentiated and divided into low and high schizotypals, and others with pathologies that entail dysfunctional attention, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and anxiety. The visual search conditions were designed to model those of traditional LI experiments, while tapping attentional processes independently of the learning scores that index LI. A variety of evidence from these and other studies is used to support the involvement of attentional and retrieval processes in LI. A model of the mechanism of action of these processes in LI is presented, together with its application to schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-243
Number of pages20
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The visual search analogue of latent inhibition: Implications for theories of irrelevant stimulus processing in normal and schizophrenic groups'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this