The viability of ethnic democracy: Jewish citizens in inter-war Poland and Palestinian citizens in Israel

Yoav Peled*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ethnic democracies are sustainable only if the two conflicting constitutional principles defining them as such - ethno-nationalism and liberal democracy - are successfully mediated by a third principle, of whatever kind. This is demonstrated through a comparative examination of interwar Poland (1918-39), where ethnic democracy, while written into the constitution, never really took hold, and Israel (within its pre-1967 borders), where ethnic democracy was stable for thirty-five years (1966-2000) but may now be eroding. In both cases the fate of ethnic democracy is shown to be determined by the existence, lack, or decline of the mediating third principle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-102
Number of pages20
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Funding

FundersFunder number
Israel Science Foundation

    Keywords

    • Citizenship
    • Democracy
    • Ethnic
    • Israel
    • Poland
    • Smooha

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