The Use of Models in Teaching Proof by Mathematical Induction

Gila Ron, Tommy Dreyfus

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Proof by mathematical induction is known to be conceptually difficult for high school students. This paper presents results from interviews with six experienced high school teachers, concerning the use of models in teaching mathematical induction. Along with creative and adequate use of models, we found explanations, models and examples that distort the underlying mathematical ideas and show teachers' conceptual difficulties. [For complete proceedings, see ED489597.]
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 28th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
PublisherInternational Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Israel
  • ERIC, Resources in Education (RIE)
  • High Schools
  • Logical Thinking
  • Validity
  • Mathematics Instruction
  • High School Students
  • Mathematical Logic
  • Models
  • Teaching Methods
  • Foreign Countries
  • Secondary School Teachers

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