The transcriptional profile of circulating myeloid derived suppressor cells correlates with tumor development and progression in mouse

Ido Nachmany, Yoel Bogoch, Gilgi Friedlander-Malik, Omer Amar, Ekaterina Bondar, Nitzan Zohar, Shay Hantisteanu, Ofer Fainaru, Nir Lubezky, Joseph M. Klausner, Niv Pencovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play key roles in cancer development. Accumulation of peripheral-blood MDSCs (PB-MDSCs) corresponds to the progression of various cancers, but provides only a crude indicator. We aimed toward identifying changes in the transcriptional profile of PB-MDSCs in response to tumor growth. CT26 colon cancer cells and B16 melanoma cells (106) were inoculated into peritoneal cavities of BALB/c mice and subcutaneously to C57-black mice, respectively. The circulating levels and global transcriptional patterns of PB CD11b+Ly6g+ MDSCs were assessed in control mice, and 4, 8, and 11 days following tumor cell inoculation. Although a significant accumulation of PB-MDSCs was demonstrated only 11 days following tumor induction, a pronounced transcriptional response was identified already on day 4 while the tumor was ~1 mm in size. Further transcriptional changes correlated with different stages of tumor growth. Key MDSC genes and canonical signaling pathways were activated along tumor progression. This phenomenon was demonstrated in both cancer models, and a consensus set of 817 genes, involved in myeloid cell recruitment and angiogenesis, was identified. The data suggest that the transcriptional signatures of PB-MDSC may serve as markers for tumor progression, as well as providing potential targets for future therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-598
Number of pages10
JournalGenes and Immunity
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2019

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