The tendency for interpersonal victimhood: The personality construct and its consequences

Rahav Gabay, Boaz Hameiri, Tammy Rubel-Lifschitz, Arie Nadler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the present research, we introduce a conceptualization of the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood (TIV), which we define as an enduring feeling that the self is a victim across different kinds of interpersonal relationships. Then, in a comprehensive set of eight studies, we develop a measure for this novel personality trait, TIV, and examine its correlates, as well as its affective, cognitive, and behavioral consequences. In Part 1 (Studies 1A-1C) we establish the construct of TIV, with its four dimensions; i.e., need for recognition, moral elitism, lack of empathy, and rumination, and then assess TIV's internal consistency, stability over time, and its effect on the interpretation of ambiguous situations. In Part 2 (Studies 2A-2C) we examine TIV's convergent and discriminant validities, using several personality dimensions, and the role of attachment styles as conceptual antecedents. In Part 3 (Studies 3–4) we explore the cognitive and behavioral consequences of TIV. Specifically, we examine the relationships between TIV, negative attribution and recall biases, and the desire for revenge (Study 3), and the effects of TIV on behavioral revenge (Study 4). The findings highlight the importance of understanding, conceptualizing, and empirically testing TIV, and suggest that victimhood is a stable and meaningful personality tendency.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110134
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume165
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Attachment styles
  • Cognitive biases
  • Interpersonal relations
  • Personality
  • Victimhood

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The tendency for interpersonal victimhood: The personality construct and its consequences'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this