The southern steppe of the Levant ca. 1050-750 BCE: A framework for a territorial history

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Abstract

The article deals with the territorial history of the southern steppe areas of the Levant in the period between ca. 1050-750 BCE. In the early days of the Iron Age, until the mid-9th century BCE, parts of them, were ruled by local desert entities: in the late Iron I a Moabite polity and in the early Iron IIA and the early years of the late Iron IIA the Tel Masos-Beer-Sheba-Negev Highlands Highlands entity. This situation changed in the later years of the Iron IIA as a result of Damascus' rise to hegemony in the Levant. In the second half of the 9th century BCE Judah, under Damascene domination, expanded for the first time into the Beer-Sheba Valley. In the first half of the eighth century BCE, with the revival of Assyrian power in the days of Adad-nirari III, Damascene authority was replaced by north Israelite domination in the south.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-104
Number of pages16
JournalPalestine Exploration Quarterly
Volume146
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Copper production
  • Gath
  • Hazael
  • Judah
  • Khirbet en-Nahas
  • Kuntillet 'Ajrud
  • Moab
  • Negev
  • Negev Highlands
  • Sheshonq I
  • Tel Masos

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