The reversed halo sign: Update and differential diagnosis

Myrna Godoy, C. Viswanathan, E. Marchiori, M. T. Truong, M. F. Benveniste, S. Rossi, E. M. Marom

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The reversed halo sign is characterised by a central ground-glass opacity surrounded by denser air-space consolidation in the shape of a crescent or a ring. It was first described on high-resolution CT as being specific for cryptogenic organising pneumonia. Since then, the reversed halo sign has been reported in association with a wide range of pulmonary diseases, including invasive pulmonary fungal infections, paracoccidioidomycosis, pneumocystis pneumonia, tuberculosis, community-acquired pneumonia, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, Wegener granulomatosis, lipoid pneumonia and sarcoidosis. It is also seen in pulmonary neoplasms and infarction, and following radiation therapy and radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary malignancies. In this article, we present the spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases that may show the reversed halo sign and offer helpful clues for assisting in the differential diagnosis. By integrating the patient's clinical history with the presence of the reversed halo sign and other accompanying radiological findings, the radiologist should be able to narrow the differential diagnosis substantially, and may be able to provide a presumptive final diagnosis, which may obviate the need for biopsy in selected cases, especially in the immunosuppressed population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1226-1235
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Radiology
Volume85
Issue number1017
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

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