The relationship between the size of spatial subsets of GER 63 channel scanner data and the quality of the internal average relative reflectance (IARR) atmospheric correction technique

E. Ben-Dor*, F. A. Kruse

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined spatial subsets derived from one fiightline of Geophysical Environmental Research (GER) 63 channel scanner data from Makhtesh Ramon, Israel, to determine the relationship between the size of spatial subsets and the quality of the Internal Average Relative Reflectance (IARR) atmospheric correction technique. The IARR procedure was run separately on spatial subsets containing 100, 53, 24, 9, 3, 0 16 and 0 02 per cent of the original data set. The correction quality was determined by comparing the reflectance spectra derived from each subset for a site containing the mineral kaolinite. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations illustrate that the raw data quality does not vary significantly from one subset to another. The quality of the correction was affected only by changes in the ‘average reference spectrum’ (ARS) associated with the selected subsets. The short-wave infrared (SWIR) region (1 440-2 443 µm) was found to be less sensitive to ARS changcs than the visible (VIS) region (0 477-0 848 µm). It was concluded that the IARR correction technique should be applied to the whole (100 per cent) data set prior to any data subsetting. Three parameters, the ‘target area ratio’ (TAR), the subset size relative to the original data set (SSR), and the correction quality ratio (CQR) are proposed as indicators of IARR correction quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-690
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1994
Externally publishedYes

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