The relationship between subjective sleep estimation and objective sleep variables in depressed patients

V. S. Rotenberg, P. Indursky, L. Kayumov, P. Sirota, Y. Melamed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: To our knowledge there is no evidence in the literature about the relationship between subjective sleep estimation and objective sleep variables in depression. It is not known whether the subjective estimation of sleep quality and sleep duration is directly related to any objective sleep variable in depressed patients. Methods: Thirty patients with major depression and 10 healthy subjects have been investigated in our sleep laboratory during 1 or 2 consecutive nights after 1 night for adaptation. Every subject, after final awakening in the laboratory, answered questions concerning the subjective feelings about sleep duration, number of awakenings and sleep depth. We compared the sleep estimation in both groups and calculated the correlation between objective and subjective sleep variables in depressed patients. Results: The degree of a wrong sleep estimation in depressed patients is larger than in healthy subjects. Slow wave sleep (SWS) in depressed patients correlates positively with the subjective estimation of sleep duration. Eye movement density in REM sleep correlates with the subjective estimation of the number of awakenings. Conclusion: SWS in depression has a positive influence on the subjective feeling of sleep duration while phasic REM sleep activity has a negative influence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-297
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2000

Keywords

  • Correlations
  • Depression
  • Sleep variables
  • Subjective estimation

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