The relationship between gray matter quantitative mri and disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

René Maxime Gracien, Alina Jurcoane, Marlies Wagner, Sarah C. Reitz, Christoph Mayer, Steffen Volz, Stephanie Michelle Hof, Vinzenz Fleischer, Amgad Droby, Helmuth Steinmetz, Frauke Zipp, Elke Hattingen, Ralf Deichmann, Johannes C. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose In secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS), global neurodegeneration as a driver of disability gains importance in comparison to focal inflammatory processes. However, clinical MRI does not visualize changes of tissue composition outside MS lesions. This quantitative MRI (qMRI) study investigated cortical and deep gray matter (GM) proton density (PD) values and T1 relaxation times to explore their potential to assess neuronal damage and its relationship to clinical disability in SPMS. Materials and Methods 11 SPMS patients underwent quantitative T1 and PD mapping. Parameter values across the cerebral cortex and deep GM structures were compared with 11 healthy controls, and correlation with disability was investigated for regions exhibiting significant group differences. Results PD was increased in the whole GM, cerebral cortex, thalamus, putamen and pallidum. PD correlated with disability in the whole GM, cerebral cortex, putamen and pallidum. T1 relaxation time was prolonged and correlated with disability in the whole GM and cerebral cortex. Conclusion Our study suggests that the qMRI parameters GM PD (which likely indicates replacement of neural tissue with water) and cortical T1 (which reflects cortical damage including and beyond increased water content) are promising qMRI candidates for the assessment of disease status, and are related to disability in SPMS.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0161036
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

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