The relation between gain in cognition during rehabilitation on functional outcome among hip fracture adult patients with and without pre- hip fracture dementia

E. H. Mizrahi, N. Harel, A. D. Heymann, E. Lubart, A. Leibovitz, E. Malik Gadot, R. B. Barkan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was focused on the relationship between change in cognition and the functional outcome during rehabilitation in demented and non-demented adult hip fracture patients. We studied seventy consecutive adult patients with hip fracture admitted to our rehabilitation wards. Functional outcome was assessed by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The gain in cognition during the rehabilitation process was measured by the difference in Mini Mental State Examination scores at admission and discharge. Data was analyzed by t-test, chi square-test and linear regression. Patients without dementia presented and discharged from the rehabilitation ward with statistically significant higher total, motor, and gain functional independence measure scores compared to patients with dementia. In a multiple regression analyses, gain in Mini Mental State scores examination were not independently associated with higher total and motor functional independence measure scores at discharge (beta = 0.086, p = 0.194; beta = 0.077, p = 0.309, respectively). Our findings suggest that there is no association between functional outcome and cognitive gain at the end of the rehabilitation process among adult hip fracture patients with and without dementia. However hip fracture adult patients with dementia should not be deprived of a post-acute rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-180
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Functional outcome
  • Hip fracture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relation between gain in cognition during rehabilitation on functional outcome among hip fracture adult patients with and without pre- hip fracture dementia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this