The prevalence of regurgitations in the first 2 days of life in human milk- and formula-fed term infants.

Mila Barak, Sigalit Lahav, Francis B. Mimouni, Shaul Dollberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Very little is known about the prevalence of regurgitations in human milk-fed infants in the first days of life. The authors aimed to compare the frequency of regurgitations in formula- and breastfed infants in the first 2 days of life. It was hypothesized that human milk-fed infants experience less episodes of regurgitations than their formula-fed counterparts. DESIGN, SAMPLE, AND OUTCOME VARIABLES: Thirty-two (32) infants were formula fed and 31 were breastfed. In both groups, infants were fed ad libitum, as soon as the mother was ready to feed the infant. All regurgitations were noted on a collection form. RESULTS: The number of regurgitations per infant in the first 48 hours of life was similar in breastfed (range 0 to 7) and formula-fed infants (range 0 to 8). There was also no difference in the number of regurgitations in the first or second 24-hour period. Eighteen of 31 of infants in the breastfed group and 17/32 in the formula fed groups had at least one episode of regurgitation during the 48-hour period. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to this hypothesis, human milk feeding did not confer a "protection" on regurgitations in these young neonates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-171
Number of pages4
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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