The personal experience of professional obsolescence among scientists and engineers in Israel

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Abstract

Summary form only given. A survey of 544 engineers and scientists from high-tech organizations in Israel explored various aspects of professional obsolescence and updating as experienced by the individual. The data indicated that respondents expected their obsolescence to worsen in the future. Of the various types of obsolescence, that in the profession was highest, whereas in the specialty it was lower, and it was lowest with regard to job requirements. Respondents viewed themselves as more up-to-date compared to reference groups in increasing psychological distances. Updating motivation was primarily intrinsic, but it was constrained (encouraged and/or inhibited) by situational and job-related factors. Updating was mostly determined by and targeted to job requirements. The data pointed to a phenomenon of constriction in the context of obsolescence, and to the salience of the current job in this context. Updating for its own sake, as preparation for the future, was rare. The results of the study point to the primary responsibility of human resource practices in maintaining currency, and to the job as the main arena for learning and updating.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication91 Portland Int Conf Manage Eng Technol
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages113
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0780301617
StatePublished - 1992
EventProceedings of the 1991 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology - PICMET '91 - Portland, OR, USA
Duration: 27 Oct 199131 Oct 1991

Publication series

Name91 Portland Int Conf Manage Eng Technol

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1991 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology - PICMET '91
CityPortland, OR, USA
Period27/10/9131/10/91

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