The origins of levels-of-processing effects in a conceptual test: Evidence for automatic influences of memory from the process-dissociation procedure

Dafna Bergerbest, Yonatan Goshen-Gottstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In three experiments, we explored automatic influences of memory in a conceptual memory task, as affected by a levels-of-processing (LoP) manipulation. We also explored the origins of the LoP effect by examining whether the effect emerged only when participants in the shallow condition truncated the perceptual processing (the lexical-processing hypothesis) or even when the entire word was encoded in this condition (the conceptual-processing hypothesis). Using the process-dissociation procedure and an implicit association-generation task, we found that the deep encoding condition yielded higher estimates of automatic influences than the shallow condition. In support of the conceptual processing hypothesis, the LoP effect was found even when the shallow task did not lead to truncated processing of the lexical units. We suggest that encoding for meaning is a prerequisite for automatic processing on conceptual tests of memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1252-1262
Number of pages11
JournalMemory and Cognition
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The origins of levels-of-processing effects in a conceptual test: Evidence for automatic influences of memory from the process-dissociation procedure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this