The novel oncogene CD24 and its arising role in the carcinogenesis of the GI tract: From research to therapy

Eyal Sagiv, Nadir Arber

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

CD24 was first described in the early 1980s and only attributed to scattered publications, referred to as a cell surface molecule in hematopoiesis. Recently, studies are accumulating to show that CD24 conveys a function in cell-to-cell interaction and regulation of proliferation and adhesion. CD24 appears to be highly expressed in a large variety of human cancers and to contribute to the acceleration of tumor growth and metastases shedding by binding to platelet (P)-selectin, L1 and by evoking - to date unknown - intracellular signal pathways. Anti-CD24 monoclonal antibodies thus act as a promising cancer treatment as was shown in the setting of gastrointestinal cancers. Recent articles also correlate CD24 expression with the identification of 'tumor stem cells'.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalExpert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • Cancer treatment
  • CD24
  • GI cancer
  • Monoclonal antibody
  • Oncogene
  • P-selectin
  • Signal transduction
  • Tumor stem cell

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