The natural history of multiple pregnancies after assisted reproduction: Is spontaneous fetal demise a clinically significant phenomenon?

S. Kol, J. Levron, N. Lewit, A. Drugan, J. Itskovitz-Eldor*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine the rate of spontaneous fetal demise after heartbeats are demonstrated in multiple pregnancies conceived after IVF-ET. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: University-based IVF-ET program. Patients: Eighty-one patients in whom initial transvaginal ultrasound (US) study, performed at 5 to 6 weeks of gestation, identified more than one gestational sac. Total number of sacs was 191. Intervention: Patients were followed by serial US examinations. Main Outcome Measure: Outcome of pregnancies. Results: Twenty-four empty gestational sacs were identified in 21 patients, of whom 15 delivered, 2 miscarried, and 4 are currently ongoing beyond first trimester. Of the 167 initially viable embryos, 9 (5%) underwent spontaneous fetal demise. In 5 of these 9 pregnancies, initial US identified significant interfetal size variation. Conclusions: The rate of spontaneous fetal demise for a specific embryo in multiple gestation, after fetal heartbeats have been identified in early pregnancy, is 5%. This rate is similar to that seen in spontaneous conceptions. The chance of future fetal demise increases if first trimester interfetal size variation is significant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-130
Number of pages4
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Spontaneous fetal demise
  • in vitro fertilization
  • multiple pregnancies

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