The myth of informal place-making: Stitching and unstitching Atarim Square in Tel Aviv

Tali Hatuka, Rachel Kallus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The metaphor of stitching/unstitching can be applied to the mechanism employed by authorities, professionals and users alike - each for a different purpose and under different circumstances - for appropriating the urban space. It views the urban space as a socio-political arena that involves ongoing negotiation. The metaphor is used in this paper to debate some basic premises of architectural discourse of the everyday. Analysis of Atarim Square on Tel Aviv's shoreline - focusing on three periods: the 1930s, 1960s and the 1990s - reveals ongoing and often simultaneous processes of 'stitching and unstitching'. The key contention here is that formal (official and professional) spatial processes are not necessarily limiting, just as informal processes (personal and communal) are not always liberating, and that both are endemic to the socio-political construct of the everyday.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-164
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Architecture
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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