The management of hyperthyroidism in children with emphasis on the use of radioactive iodine

Scott A. Rivkees, J. Sack, Z. Laron, N. Saka, B. Glaser, C. Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Graves' disease is the most common form of hyperthyroidism in childhood. Current treatment options include antithyroid medications, surgery, and radioactive iodine. Medical therapy is generally associated with long-term remission rates of less than 25% and a small risk of serious adverse reactions that include hepatic failure and bone marrow suppression. Total thyroidectomy is associated with very high cure rates and a small risk of hypoparathyroidism and recurrent laryngeal nerve damage. When radioactive iodine is used at appropriate doses, there is a very high cure rate without increased risks of thyroid cancer or genetic damage. Because of the theoretical risk of thyroid cancer after thyroid irradiation in individuals less than 20 years of age, relatively high doses of radioactive iodine should be administered to minimize residual thyroid tissue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)212-222
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Endocrinology Reviews
Volume1
Issue numberSUPLL. 2
StatePublished - Dec 2003

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Pediatric
  • Radioactive iodine
  • Remission

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The management of hyperthyroidism in children with emphasis on the use of radioactive iodine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this