The Long-Term Outcome of Kidney Transplant Recipients in the Eighth Decade Compared With Recipients in the Seventh Decade of Life

Shirley Rahel Visan, Roni Baruch, Doron Schwartz, Idit F. Schwartz, Yaacov Goykhman, Michal Ariela Raz, Moshe Shashar, Keren Cohen-Hagai, Naomi Nacasch, Orit Kliuk-Ben-Bassat, Ayelet Grupper*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: With the aging of the population, more older patients are being considered for kidney transplantation; therefore, it is crucial to evaluate the risks and benefits of transplantation in this population. This study aimed to assess long-term outcomes of kidney transplantation in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation at age >70 years, compared with patients aged 60 to 69 years at transplantation. Methods: Included in the study were 261 consecutive kidney transplant recipients: 52 were aged >70 years, and 209 were aged 60 to 69 years at transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively and analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to identify potential outcome risk factors. Results: The number of transplants in both groups increased during the study period. Mortality after transplantation was strongly correlated to age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.05-1.18; P < .001), deceased donor (HR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.8; P = .034), and pretransplant diabetes (HR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.7-4.9; P = .001). Recipients aged >70 years had an increased risk of death censored graft failure (HR = 2.98; 95% CI, 1.56-5.74; P = .001). In living donor transplants, 3-year survival was 80% in recipients age >70 years, compared with 98% in the 60- to 69-year group. Five-year survival was 71% and 92%, respectively. In deceased donor transplants, 3-year survival was 63% and 78%, and 5-year survival was 58% and 72%, respectively. The risk of malignancy (excluding nonmelanotic skin cancer) was nearly triple in the age >70 years group (HR = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.3-6.8; P = .01). Conclusions: Patient and graft survival in kidney recipients in the eighth decade is worse compared with recipients in the seventh decade of life. However, it is improved with living kidney donation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2063-2070
Number of pages8
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume55
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2023

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