The influence of abutment angulation on strains and stresses along the implant/bone interface: comparison between two experimental techniques.

T. Brosh*, R. Pilo, D. Sudai

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Preangled abutments produce different stress distribution compared to straight abutments. PURPOSE: The objectives of this study were to (1) test the hypothesis that preangled abutments produce different stress distribution than straight abutments by using strain gauges attached to implants embedded in a medium simulating bone to determine strain distribution along the implant/bone interface; (2) test this hypothesis by photoelastic method; and (3) compare the two experimental techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five Integral Omniloc cylindrical implants 13 x 4 mm were polished to remove the hydroxyapatite coating, then six linear miniature strain gauges were attached, three on each side of the implant's surface. Two similar implants were embedded in a photoelastic material. Three abutments, straight, 15 degrees, and 25 degrees, were connected to each implant; strain versus applied compressive forces were recorded. Strain response to force parameter was defined as the slope of the strain-force curve. Isochromatic fringe patterns were also recorded. RESULTS: The strain gauge measurements showed higher, threefold and 4.4-fold, compressive strain concentration in the coronal zone of the implant when 15-degree and 25-degree angulated abutments were used, respectively, compared with the straight abutment; whereas the photoelastic method showed an increase of only 11% in fringe order. Tensile strains were also measured from the coronal contralateral position on the implant, where photoelastic models did not show a change in stress type. CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained from strain gauges bonded to implants embedded in a medium can represent a precise simulation of the clinical condition when analyzing stress distribution along the implant/ bone interface. Photoelasticity provides different information and therefore should be regarded as a complementary method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-334
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1998

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