The Impact of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation on Mitral Regurgitation Regression in High-Risk Patients with Aortic Stenosis

Leor Perl, Mordehay Vaturi, Abid Assali, Alexander Sagie, Adaya Weissler-Snir, Pablo Codner, Katia Orvin, Hana Vaknin-Assa, Yaron Shapira, Ran Kornowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: In patients with aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common finding. Little is known regarding outcomes of MR in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The study aim was to characterize the short- and mid-term impact of the TAVI procedure on MR grade.

METHODS: A total of 261 patients (59% females; mean age 82.1 +/- 6.9 years) undergoing TAVI was assessed for rates of significant MR and the severity of MR at baseline, and at one month and six months after the procedure.

RESULTS: In patients with moderate MR or above at baseline (n = 26, 10% of the cohort), there was a mean reduction in grade of 1.5 +/- 1.1 and 1.8 +/- 1.4 after one and six months, respectively (p < 0.01). Reduction in MR grade (1+) at six months was identified in 54.1% (40/74) of patients with mild-moderate MR or greater, and in 88.5% (23/26) of those with moderate MR or above, and was associated with an improved NYHA functional class (correlation coefficient r = -0.294, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified low pulmonary pressure and tricuspid regurgitation as independent predictors of improvements in MR.

CONCLUSION: Among the present cohort of patients undergoing TAVI, those with MR at baseline showed an improvement in the severity of their MR. Patients with moderate MR regurgitation or above demonstrated the greatest improvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Heart Valve Disease
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2015

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