The impact of structural empowerment on individual well-being and performance: Taking agent preferences, self-efficacy and operational constraints into account

Michal Biron, Peter Bamberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We integrate psychological and socio-structural perspectives on empowerment by examining: a) the impact of actual structural empowerment initiatives (as opposed to perceptions of such empowering acts) aimed at enhancing employee influence over which tasks to perform (as opposed to how to perform them) on employee well-being and performance, b) the degree to which self-efficacy mediates these effects, and c) the extent to which, by applying such initiatives more selectively, performance-related empowerment effects may be amplified. Results of a simulation-based experiment indicate that while granting decision latitude over which tasks to perform has beneficial effects on both individual performance and well-being, self-efficacy partially mediates the effects only on the latter. Results also indicate that the direct performance-related effects of such interventions may be further increased without any significant decline in employee well-being to the extent that such structural empowerment is applied more selectively and offered as a performance-based incentive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-191
Number of pages29
JournalHuman Relations
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autonomy
  • Burnout
  • Call center
  • Customer service agents
  • Empowerment
  • Job design

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of structural empowerment on individual well-being and performance: Taking agent preferences, self-efficacy and operational constraints into account'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this