The impact of serum albumin and serum protein levels on POSSUM score of patients with proximal femur fractures

Ely L. Steinberg*, Eyal Amar, Yael Sagy, Ehud Rath, Assaf Kadar, Amir Sternheim

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: POSSUM was developed to predict risk-adjusted mortality and morbidity rates for surgical procedures. We evaluated the impact of serum albumin and serum protein levels on POSSUM scores. Methods: Medical files of 2269 patients operated for proximal femur fractures were reviewed. Preoperative serum albumin levels were available for 387 patients (mean 35.1 g/l, range 22-49) and serum protein levels for 279 patients (mean 61.6 g/l, range 40-86). Results: Serum albumin and protein levels were inversely associated with mortality in multivariate models (albumin, OR = 0.89, p = 0.009; protein, OR = 0.92, p = 0.009) and in composite outcome models as well (albumin, OR = 0.955, p = 0.219, protein, OR = 0.94, p = 0.014). The area under the curve (AUC) for POSSUM prediction of mortality (n = 1770) was 0.632 (95% CI: 0.580-0.684, p < 0.001). The AUC for a model including serum protein levels was 0.742 (95% CI: 0.649-0.834, p < 0.001). Hospitalisation time was longer for patients with lower serum proteins levels (p = 0.045), with an inverse correlation (Pearson correlation ≥0.164, p = 0.011). Conclusions: Lower preoperative serum albumin and serum protein levels were associated with increased risk for mortality, increased hospitalisation time and poorer outcomes in patients operated for proximal femoral fractures. Including those values to POSSUM scores would increase their predictive power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1928-1931
Number of pages4
JournalInjury
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Hospitalisation time
  • Mortality
  • POSSUM score
  • Serum albumin
  • Serum protein

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of serum albumin and serum protein levels on POSSUM score of patients with proximal femur fractures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this