The impact of concomitant fibromyalgia on visual analogue scales of pain, fatigue and function in patients with various rheumatic disorders

Ofer Levy*, Refael Segal, Ilya Maslakov, Andrey Markov, Moshe Tishler, Mirit Amit-Vazina

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the impact of concomitant fibromyalgia on the rating of pain, fatigue, and dysfunction, in patients with various rheumatic disorders. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a hospital-based rheumatology unit. Standard clinical and laboratory data were obtained and all patients completed questionnaires on pain, fatigue, and daily function. The rate of concomitant fibromyalgia was estimated using the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for fibromyalgia and the analysis concentrated on visual analogue scales (VAS). Results. Six hundred and eighteen visits of 383 patients with inflammatory as well as non-inflammatory rheumatic disorders were analysed. Concomitant fibromyalgia was noted in 74 patients (23% of the cohort). Patients with rheumatic diseases and concomitant fibromyalgia had significantly higher mean VAS scores for pain, fatigue, and function (79±17, 81±18, 80±18 respectively) as compared to patients who had no features of fibromyalgia (47±28, 50±29, 44±30, respectively; all p-values <0.001). The scores reported by patients with rheumatic diseases and concomitant fibromyalgia were similar to the scores obtained from patients with primary FM. Conclusion. Concomitant FM is common both among patients with inflammatory and patients with non inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Concomitant FM has a remarkable impact on the severity of symptoms and, moreover, patients with concomitant FM exhibit extreme and significantly distinct levels of pain and fatigue which is as severe as that reported by patients with primary FM. It seems that fibromyalgic features dominate and become the main cause of morbidity in rheumatological patients with concomitant FM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-124
Number of pages5
JournalClinical and Experimental Rheumatology
Volume34
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Concomitant fibromyalgia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Rheumatic disorders

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